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[ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: any way jim so i'm saying to jacki schechner when she's in my bed yesterday morning along with a bunch of other people -- >> what? >> stephanie: i'm sorry the camera is on. >> along with a bunch of other people? [ laughter ] >> stephanie: little titillating. i had a dinner party saturday night and it had more to do with -- jacki, we all partied a little hardy. it was a big slumber party. >> very responsible in l.a. if you're going to consume too many adult beverages to make the decision not to drive so that's what we did. lucky enough, stephanie has a home that's decorated like a bed and breakfast and you can pick your room. >> stephanie: exactly. just saying. not what you thought. >> would you like the naked marilyn photograph room. would you like the country breakfast room? >> stephanie: all right. anyway, i was trying to get jim's attention. good morning jacki. thank god it was a slow "newsweek" last week. >> we have lily tomlin today. >> stephanie: here's jacki schechner. >> happy monday. governor deval patrick is asking massachusetts residents
're hearing about a killer. >> jim walsh, you're with us on the phone there? i'm sorry, you're with us? you have your camera up? can you understand us? >> yes, i can hear you. >> all right, greg, you understand -- you hear the conversation we're having right now trying to put together the picture of this. try to put into context your experience. >> let me just say this. i want to underline what you've said so far. i think it's important. the analogy i would make is if these guys were irish americans, or from ireland originally, we might be inclined to jump to think it's the ira or terrorism associated with northern ireland. and i think it would be a mistake to leap to that conclusion. i think you're right to say the chechen angle may be part of it. it may be something else. it may be a fully domestic issue that animates them or has motivated them. so i think we need to be cautious about this. and i think you're right to say that. >> we were also talking, just before you came back up, how this is going to end. and the police were worried this is sort of like a trapped animal. he could try to
're also learning a lot more about this 19-year-old suspect who is still at large. cnn's jim acosta has been keeping track of what his relatives, other acquaintances are saying, as well as some of the things that we're learning about this 19-year-old, who apparently, what he said about himself on social media. jim, tell our viewers what you're learning. >> wolf, the profile that's emerging of this suspect, a young man who is sort of a mystery. he's described by his classmates, even some relatives as a friendly student athlete, but one relative, and even the suspect's activities on social media suggest he may have become more radical leading up to the bombing. the manhunt may be for someone who is just 19 years old, but authorities warn the boston bombing suspect who is still on the run, believed to be wearing the white baseball cap in the surveillance video released by the fbi, who looks even more boyish in this updated photo, should be considered armed and dangerous. relatives who haven't been in touch with him can only guess about his motives since he moved to the u.s. over a decade a
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
, that is the --. >> host: charles there is tweet relating to what you're saying. jim writes can an american citizen be considered an enemy combatant? >> guest: absolutely goes back to the civil war. goes certainly to world war ii. anwar al-awlaki was american-born. president obama use ad drone to kill him in the wilds of yemen. if you, if you fill eight yourself with enemy forces and you go to war against american citizens and you kill americans will fully and you do so on behalf of a movement or enemy forces then indeed you can be considered an enemy combatant. being a enemy combatant simply because you're an american citizen. if in world war ii you went over and joined nazi forces were you not a enemy combatant? of course you were. . . >> he didn't treat those terrible tragedies as access war, but appropriately treated them as heinous criminal acts to be investigated, prosecuted, and appropriately punishes. >> host: al-alwaki was an american citizen, kimed on orders of president obama. did president obama violate the constitution by doing that? >> guest: well, actually, we have a lawsuit in which
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5